Papers

Smartphone Use and Activities by People with Disabilities: 2015-2016 Survey

Access and use of mainstream wireless technology is essential to social and economic participation, which can be especially challenging to people with disabilities. Technology ownership rates are indicative of general access to these critical technologies. However, analysis of the activities of technology users can provide more detailed assessment of the nature and degree of technology access. This article presents findings from the

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Introducing Assistive Technology and Universal Design Theory, Applications in Design Education

Choi, Y (2018). Introducing Assistive Technology and Universal Design Theory, Applications in Design Education. In Langdon, P., Lazar, J., Heylighen, A., Dong, H (Ed.), Breaking Down Barriers: Usability, Accessibility, and Inclusive Dseign (pp. 29-39). Basel Switzerland: Springer International Publishing

Abstract: The aim of this study was to better understand
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American Sign Language & Emergency Alerts: The Relationship between Language, Disability, and Accessible Emergency Messaging

Bennet, D, LaForce, S, Touzet, C, Choido, K (2018). American Sign Language & Emergency Alerts: The Relationship between Language, Disability, and Accessible Emergency Messaging. International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, 2018, 71-87.

Abstract: Emergency alert messages are not always completely accessible for people who are Deaf that rely on American Sign Language (ASL). ASL is a visual and conceptual...

Wireless RERC Research Included in Book Chapter, Text-to-Action: Understanding the Interaction Between Accessibility of Wireless Emergency Alerts and Behavioral Response

Publication Type: 
Risk Communication and Community Resilience book cover Routledge Studies in Hazards, Disaster Risk and Climate Change Edited by Bandana Kar and David M. Cochran, Jr.

Wireless RERC project director (PD), Salimah LaForce, and DeeDee Bennett, former Wireless RERC PD and currently, associate professor at the University at Albany, The State University of New York co-authored Text-to-Action: Understanding the Interaction Between Accessibility of Wireless Emergency Alerts and Behavioral Response. This book chapter was published in Risk Communication and Community Resilience and focuses on the accessibility of emergency alerts on mobile devices for vulnerable populations emphasizing concerns of people with disabilities. The chapter describes accessibility considerations across the warning process; receiving factors that impact understanding, and responding (i.e., the decision to take protective action) to alerts and warnings sent via mobile wireless devices. It provides background information on wireless alerting mechanisms and summarizes the results from several studies related to WEA. Studies summarized in this chapter were supported by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDLRR); the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), FEMA-Integrated Public Alert and Warning Project Management Office; and the DHS Science and Technology Directorate. It is available in both hard copy format and on Kindle.

Date of Publication: 
Friday, June 28, 2019

The Assistive Wearable: Inclusive by Design

Wearable technology has the potential to usher in a new wave of assistive technology. Many wearable devices are already being used by people with disabilities as assistive technology. Here we discuss how designers might use design considerations and body maps to make sure that the wearable devices they are creating are accessible to everyone. The hope is that, with a thoughtful process, new wearable technology can also act seamlessly as assistive technology.

Wearable Technology Affordances Body Maps

Zeagler, Clint. 2017. “Where to Wear It : Functional , Technical , and Social Considerations in On - Body Location for Wearable Technology 20 Years of Designing for Wearability.” In International Symposium on Wearable Computers. Maui, Hawaii. doi:10.1145/3123021.3123042.

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Model Techniques for Consumer-Driven Research, Proceedings of the Festival of International Conferences on Caregiving, Disability, Aging, and Technology

 This paper chronicles the Wireless RERC’s user research efforts from 2001-2011 and offers lessons learned through these efforts.  The authors hope that this model will be of value to other research organizations for including people with disabilities in development of technologies that are truly assistive and supportive. ...

Social Media, Public Emergencies & Disability

Longitudinal survey research data from two surveys conducted in 2010-2011 and 2012-2013, respectively, on the use of social media and other media and devices during public emergencies by people with disabilities are analyzed. The survey data show that television remains the primary means for receiving and verifying public alerts. In the two years between the two emergency communications surveys the alerting methods used to receive emergency alerts

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Attention, Memory, & Wearable Interfaces

The paper considers the limits of human attention and how wearable interfaces should be developed to complement, not interfere, with normal human capabilities. Most interfaces on desktop computers do not have this problem; desktop interface designers can assume that the user is solely concentrating on the digital task. However, a major advantage of a wearable is that users can take it anywhere and use it anytime.

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The contents of this website were developed under a grant from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR grant number 90RE5025-01-00). NIDILRR is a Center within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of NIDILRR, ACL, HHS, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.